I have been thinking about angles, about the breaks of a line, the twisting of an ankle, of tripping, about any alteration of a trajectory.

What a joy to move from a handshake to a hug. Fortunate events have to happen for this inertia to appear. What a moment of elation to exchange that first hug with someone you encounter for the second time.

 

I have seen a wax line making itself fit into a corner. It pulls from its inner strength, its extremities stick to the walls. What arises is the longest, most narrow trapeze I have ever seen.

 

Maybe a straight line was once an angle that closed in on itself.

 

How do you allow a single line to take a rest from the form of which it occupies? How can you witness the moment in which it decides its own direction?

 

While I believe I am moving forward, all I am really doing is pushing the triangle backwards. It becomes more complex when the things that integrate it begin to break off.

 

Maybe a straight line was once an angle that opened itself.

 

How long does it take to get out of the triangle?

 

How long does it take to arrive at the line?

 

Daniela Libertad. April 2016. Austin TX

EST_Inversión5_montados_web.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (inversión 5), 2019
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 306.9 cm
EST_Reforma1_2019_completas.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (reforma 1), 2019
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 418.5 cm
DL_Triángulo_Amarillo.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (distensión-tensión), 2017
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 418.5 cm
EST_PN_2017_Par.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (Positivo-Negativo), 2017
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 418.5 cm
EST_Desdoble.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (desdoble), 2017
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 672 cm
Estudio sobre triángulo (disección), 2017
Graphite on paper.
35.5 x 279 cm
DL_EST_(inversion)2016_Montaje.jpg
Estudio sobre triángulo (inversión 1), 2016
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 362.7 cm
Estudio sobre triángulo (inversión 2), 2016
Color pencil on paper.
35.5 x 306.9 cm
Estudio para  triángulos abiertos 2, 2016
Wood
31 x 60.5 cm
Estudio para  triángulos abiertos, 2014
Wood
35 x 48 cm
Estudio para  triángulo de cuatro líneas, 2013-2015
Wood
185 x 80 x 1 cm

Estudio sobre triángulo, 2016

Residency / Solo show at The Museum of Human Achievement, Austin, TX.

Curated by Leslie Moody Castro

According to definition, a triangle is composed of three straight sides and three angles. In other words, three lines, bent at various yet specific angles together make the closed figure of a triangle. In the hands of Daniela Libertad, however, these simple properties that define the triangle are problematized in the most subtly poetic ways. During her time in residence at the Museum of Human Achievement and during the Fusebox Festival, Daniela will make the properties of the triangle her subject matter, questioning its definition through a variety of medium, and exploring how this simple, yet complex form creates relationships with space and the human body.

                           

 Leslie Moody Castro

Publication available on PDF

Exhibition view. The Museum of Human Achievement. Austin, TX
Photo credit: Lauren Klotzman
Exhibition view. The Museum of Human Achievement. Austin, TX
Photo credit: Lauren Klotzman
Exhibition view. The Museum of Human Achievement. Austin, TX
Photo credit: Lauren Klotzman
Amarillo 3, 2016 . Color pencil on paper . 41 x 42 inches
Photo credit: Donny Ray
Amarillo 2, 2016 . Color pencil on paper . 41 x 42 inches
Photo credit: Donny Ray
Exhibition view. The Museum of Human Achievement. Austin, TX
Photo credit: Lauren Klotzman
Estudio para triángulo abierto, 2016 . Copper pipes . 32 x 05 x 183 inches​
Photo credit: Donny Ray
Amarillo 5, 2016 . Color pencil on paper . 41 x 42 inches
Photo credit: Donny Ray
Puntos de tensión (2), 2016 . Cotton thread, pins . 17 x 0.3 x 17 inches
Puntos de tensión (1), 2016 . Cotton thread, pin . 34 x 0.3 x 0.1 inches